SpotShotter: New Technology Could Help Detect Gunfire

The SpotShotter tool is a gunfire detector gadget. Its wireless sensors pick up the sound of gunshots and differentiate sfrom other loud noises, such as fireworks. When a gun goes off, a sound wave registers on the device, which sends a message within seconds to the police dispatch computers. It can detect gunfire as close as 10 feet away in a two-mile range.

The SpotShotter provides law enforcement officials with an interesting means of forensic evaluation. By affixing acoustic sensors to trees, telephone poles, and other towering structures, the SpotShotter monitors the auditory signature of gunshots. When a shot is fired and detected, the SpotShotter calculates the position from which it was fired, based on acoustic information received by the sensors, then sends the data (via phone lines) to a central server, which law enforcement agents can access for their investigation.

A similar device used in the military is the “Boomerang” microphone, which is mounted to an army vehicle (HMMWV), and is an acoustic system designed to detect the range and elevation of incoming small arms fire. The “Boomerang” system is being developed by the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory in Quantico, VA and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Photo courtesy Marine Corps Warfighting Lab via Office of Naval Research

Read more about crimebusting at Law Enforcement News

via Bruce Schneier blog (thanks James King)

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Locating Social Reponsibility: CCTV & Public Space

Jamie Bulger on CCTV

Department of Psychology, Lancaster University – Mark Levine and John Dixon

ABSTRACT:This paper will present data from a Home Office funded study of the impact of public order measures like CCTV surveillance and street drinking legislation on social relations in public space. The focus of the research was the town square in Lancaster city centre. Data comprised a survey (n=808) and in-situ interviews (n= 59) with users of the town square including teenagers, mothers with young children, homeless people, travellers, commercial workers and the elderly. The paper will concentrate on one emergent property of the analysis. Where most public order research focuses on concepts of ‘risk’ and ‘trust’, we explore the impact of CCTV surveillance on ideas of social responsibility. In particular, we present evidence that support for CCTV is related to lower feelings of responsibility for the welfare of others who might be co-present in public space. We consider this in terms of the idea of diffusion of responsibility to the CCTV apparatus. We also examine, against a background of high levels of support for CCTV, the tensions between ideas of freedom and accountability that are revealed in talk about that support. We draw these out by comparing and contrasting talk about CCTV cameras with talk about speed (Gatso) cameras.

A link to miquel mora’s Identity Protection System (IDPS) project

Download Mark & John’s presentation> Locating Social Reponsibility: CCTV & Public Space ppt

Detection

detection

Images from top left to right:
Radiation dosimeter wrist badge , geiger counter, handheld metal detecting mail scanner, dosimeter ring badge, blood pressure monitoring device, alcohol breath tester,dosimeter ring, fat calipers, pulse monitor, personal radiation Monitors, CT-80 explosive detection system.