Ghost Bikes

Just 5 minutes from where I live is a ghost bike: a painted white bicycle that has been locked to a fence to act as a memorial to a recent bike fatality in the area. I ride past it every day and every time I see it I am extremely aware of how easy it is to be destroyed by an oncoming vehicle. It is disturbing but a moving gesture of remembrance and warning to all those on the road and not just to cyclists. The idea of the ghost bike memorial has its roots in St. Louis, Missouri since 2003. The ghostbike.org site it is intended to act as a meeting point for discussion and locates incidents in various cities around the world and was set up by the NYC Street Memorial Project. It is a space where those lost on dangerous streets can be remembered by their loved ones, members of their local communities, and others from around the world. They hope to inspire more people to start installing ghost bikes in their communities and to initiate changes that will make it safer to travel on the streets.

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Safe Driving?

treafficlights.jpg

Taking its lead from recent high-profile experiments in the Netherlands and Germany , the Kensington and Chelsea council wants to begin removing traffic lights from Exhibition Road. It is part of an audacious campaign by the council to forge modern ‘shared streetscapes’ where eye contact between motorists and pedestrians and simple common sense replace a ‘clutter’ of bollards and barriers, traffic lights, street signs and speed cameras.

via The Observer

‘The School Journey: visible and invisible dangers’

A childs depiction of air pollution and the school journey

Pollution data


Duncan Whyatt and Marion Walker, Geography, Lancaster University

ABSTRACT:

This paper stems from an ESRC funded project that uses a combination of traditional and novel techniques to gain a deeper understanding of the school journey. A group of 30 teenagers were asked to use a customised mobile phone application, which automatically recorded their routes, to take photographs and write texts to describe their journeys. These images and texts were subsequently used in interviews with the teenagers to explore factors influencing the choice of route. In this paper we focus on visible and invisible dangers associated with such journeys and consider how this information may be used in the design of safer journeys.

Download The school journey presentation