Scapehood Protection Device Available For General Public

A woman wears a Scapehood protection device, developed and manufactured by ILC February 25, 2003 in Frederica, Delaware. ILC started making the Scapehood for the general public and protects against chemical warfare agents and biological, radiological, and nuclear inhalation particulates. The Scapehood comes in an adult size and smaller sizes for children and infants. It costs $199.00 per unit and is available over the company’s website. The following describes its top 10 features:

AUTOMATIC BLOWER ACTUATION
NO NOSECUP
BLOWER INDICATOR LIGHT
LOW DUROMETER NECKDAM
CLEAR HOOD/LARGE VISOR
QUIET 45 LPM BLOWER
EXHAUST VALVE
POLYCARBONATE BLOWER CONSTRUCTION
FILTER CANISTER
SEALED CASE

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Defendus labyrinth door chain

The defendus labyrinth door chain is by the Art Lebedev studio in Moscow. Crazy projects, a real assertive design attitude.

Product features:

  • Chain style Doorlock forces you to solve a maze to exit
  • 100% Titanium Alloy Construction
  • 8″ chain
  • 10 mounting screws included (2 extra)
  • Tested to 700lbs of force.

Anti-collision cars(and inflatables!)

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New technology means that cars can avoid colliding with each other, with the potential of reducing crashes. Check out this video of a protective car collision>

How To Reduce The Chances Of Being A Terror Victim

How To Reduce The Chances Of Being A Terror Victim

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The band XX Teens are soon to release their single: “How To Reduce The Chances Of Being A Terror Victim”. They use a variety of security announcements as lyrics to accompany an amusing dystopian depiction of “uberprotection” & “ubersafety” society in their music video.


From The Complete Terrorism Survival Guide: How to Travel, Work and Live in Safety

6. Never check luggage at curbside check-in at airports; carry luggage on board with you, if possible; carry as few bags as possible.

7. Spend as little time at the airport as possible; avoid heavily glassed areas.

8. When flying, wear comfortable clothing and shoes in case you need to quickly evacuate.

9. Try to fly on wide-body planes; terrorists often avoid hijacking them.

…….

Safe Weaponery

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Martin Postler, a recent graduate from the MA Design Products course at the RCA, London designed the AK47 Paper Gun Model Kit. Martin has freed the AK-47 from its terrible capacity to injure and kill by reconstructing it into a paper model construction set. Martin works alongside Ian Ferguson. Check out there company profile: postlerferguson

The prison cell and the third space

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Happiness is Door-Shaped: Issues of Control and Safety in Prison – Anita Wilson, Literacy research centre, Lancaster University

‘Happiness is door shaped’ is a phrase well-known to those of us who undertake long-term sustained prison ethnographies. We hear it uttered by disillusioned, ‘old-style’ prison officers who are uncomfortable with contemporary prison policy and its ‘modern’ ideas of prisoner rehabilitation through socialisation rather than isolation. Happiness for these officers is achieved by putting prisoners ‘behind the door’, thus creating a protective barrier that maintains the distance between ‘us’ (the keepers) and ‘them’ (the kept). Confining prisoners to their cells appears to make these officers feel secure, protecting them from risk of attack, disease, or emotional attachment to or from prisoners.

Ironically, while not exactly ‘happy’, and albeit for quite different reasons, many prisoners are agreeable to such distanciation. What officers see as confinement, prisoners see as liberation. Time spent ‘behind the door’ provides them with a much needed opportunity for contemplation, for ‘personal’ time, and for relaxation. What staff see as punitive, prisoners see as a welcome escape from their day to day proximity to shouting, jostling, fighting, bullying, anger, fear and distress.

However, while ‘door-shaped happiness’ for officers is achieved through the single act of protecting themselves from contact with prisoners, ‘ door-shaped happiness’ for prisoners involves engagement with complex and continual acts of transformation, which take on any number of subtle and personalised forms, and respond to the status of the person and the place in which they find themselves. They identify some nuanced strategies for resilience and survival, that draw on the practices of social rather than institutional worlds.

This paper takes a look behind various prison doors to reveal how prisoners create some of their own places of ‘safe living’ as a way of countering the ‘door-shaped unhappiness’ of imposed confinement.

‘The School Journey: visible and invisible dangers’

A childs depiction of air pollution and the school journey

Pollution data


Duncan Whyatt and Marion Walker, Geography, Lancaster University

ABSTRACT:

This paper stems from an ESRC funded project that uses a combination of traditional and novel techniques to gain a deeper understanding of the school journey. A group of 30 teenagers were asked to use a customised mobile phone application, which automatically recorded their routes, to take photographs and write texts to describe their journeys. These images and texts were subsequently used in interviews with the teenagers to explore factors influencing the choice of route. In this paper we focus on visible and invisible dangers associated with such journeys and consider how this information may be used in the design of safer journeys.

Download The school journey presentation